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Burl, Aubrey

Prehistoric Stone Circles
Stone circles have excited the imagination of their visitors ever since the time of John Aubrey, the seventeenth century antiquarian who was the first person to study them seriously. For three hundred years archaeologists, astronomers and anthropologists have aruged about the purpose of these abandoned rings. Modern excavations have showsn that the earliest circles were erected over five thousand tyears ago and that often sightlines were built into them towards the sun or moon. This book describes these rings, including Stonehenge, explains their history and the facts known about them, and shows how we are gradually coming to an understanding of the significance these gaunt, grey circles had to their builders.

Caird, Rod

Ape Man: The Story of Human Evolution
Surveys our current understanding of human evolution, looks at important discoveries, and discusses the reasons for the development of upright posture, bigger brains, and the use of language.

Cavalli-Sforza, Luigi Luca

Genes, Peoples, and Languages
Historians relying on written records can tell us nothing about the 99.9% of human evolution which preceded the invention of writing. It is the study of genetic variation, backed up by language and archaeology, which provides concrete evidence aboutthe spread of farming, the movements of peoples across the globe, the precise links between races - and the sheer unscientific absurdity of racism. Genes, Peoples and Languages offers an astonishing investigation into the past 100,000 years of human history and a rare, firsthand account of some of the most significant and gripping scientific work of recent years. Cavalli-Sforza is one of the great founding fathers of archaeogenetics, and in this book he maps out some of its grand themes.

Cherfas, Jeremy (Editor)

Darwin up to date (A New scientist guide)
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Coon, Carleton S.

The Hunting Peoples
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Copley, Gordon J.

Going Into the Past
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Cornwall, I.W.

The World of Ancient Man
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Darvill, Timothy

Ancient Britain -AA Glovebox Guide
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Dawkins, Richard

River Out of Eden
The river of Dawkins's title is a river of DNA, flowing through time from the beginning of life on earth to the present - and onwards. Dawkins explains that DNA must be thought of as the most sophisticated information system imaginable: 'Life is just bytes and bytes of information,' he writes. Using this perspective, he describes the mechanisms by which evolution has taken place, gradually but inexorably, over a period of three thousand million years. It is the story of how evolution happens, rather than a narrative of what has actually happened in evolution. He discusses current views on the process of human evolution, including the idea that we all trace back to a comparatively recent African 'Eve', and speculates that the 'information explosion' that was unleashed on Earth when DNA came into being has almost certainly happened in other places in the universe.

Dawkins, Richard

The Ancestor's Tale - A Pilgrimage to the Dawn of Life
The Ancestor's Tale takes us from our immediate human ancestors back through what Dawkins calls ‘concestors,’ those shared with the apes, monkeys and other mammals and other vertebrates and beyond to the dim and distant microbial beginnings of life some 4 billion years ago. It is a remarkable story which is still very much in the process of being uncovered. And, of course from a scientist of Dawkins stature and reputation we get an insider's knowledge of the most up-to-date science and many of those involved in the research. And, as we have come to expect of Dawkins, it is told with a passionate commitment to scientific veracity and a nose for a good story. Dawkins's knowledge of the vast and wonderful sweep of life's diversity is admirable. Not only does it encompass the most interesting living representatives of so many groups of organisms but also the important and informative fossil ones, many of which have only been found in recent years.

Deacon, Terrence

The Symbolic Species - the Co-Evolution of Language & the Brain
Terrence Deacon's The Symbolic Species begins with a question posed by a 7- year-old child: Why can't animals talk? Or, as Deacon puts it, if animals have simpler brains, why can't they develop a simpler form of language to go with them? Thus begins the basic line of inquiry for this breathtakingly ambitious work, which attempts to describe the origins of human language and consciousness.

Diamond, Jared

The Rise & Fall of the Third Chimpanzee
More than 98 percent of human genes are shared with two species of chimpanzee. The 'third' chimpanzee is man. Jared Diamond surveys out life-cycle, culture, sexuality and destructive urges both towards ourselves and the planet to explore the ways in which we are uniquely human yet still influenced by our animal origins.

Eldredge, Niles

Life Pulse: Episodes from the Story of the Fossil Record
This work reveals the crucial episodes in the history of our planet and puts forward a theory of evolution that suggests long periods of little change followed by mass extinction and upheaval, then by brief periods of rapid evolutionary development, as species evolve to replace extinct types.

Fagan, Brian M.

The Journey from Eden: The Peopling of Our World
Discusses a controversial theory of common human ancestry in the form of one woman who lived in Africa approximately 150,000 years ago, and discusses the ways in which early humans evolved and spread out around the world.

Fagan, Brian M.

The Journey from Eden: The Peopling of Our World
Discusses a controversial theory of common human ancestry in the form of one woman who lived in Africa approximately 150,000 years ago, and discusses the ways in which early humans evolved and spread out around the world.

Gamble, Clive

Timewalkers : The Prehistory of Global Colonization
As soon as we ask why "we are the only animal with a near-global distribution", argues Clive Gamble, the central truth emerges: "Humans went everywhere in prehistory because humans have purpose." His book uses this perspective to reinterpret three million years of archaeology, showing how the earliest humans of the African savannah spread out to other continents, along the Old World track, and eventually colonized the world. On the way occurred "the meeting of the Ancients and the Moderns - the European Neanderthals and the Cro-Magnons - celebrated in many illustrations, motion pictures and novels". Scientific detective work can now illuminate all these issues, revealing what we are today through the study of our origins.

Gilbert, Martin

Dent Atlas of American History
Covering the complete history of America in 138 maps, this atlas includes - politics, military events, social history, transport and economics.

Gould, Stephen Jay

The Book of Life - an Illustrated History of the Evolution of Life on Earth
An illustrated natural history of the Earth and its denizens combines paintings, drawings, and computer-generated images with a chronicle of the world's variegated organisms and species.

Gowlett, John

Ascent to Civilization: The Archaeology of early Man
This book is an account of the rise and development of human culture, told in terms of its discovery. This book describes how tools were used, techniques of hunting and gathering food, migration over continents, strange and beautiful cave paintings, and the developments from agriculture to the written word. The book discusses important finds bearing on the earliest human ancestors, such as extraordinarily complete fossils found from the area west of Lake Turkana during the 1980s. It contains hundreds of photographs, drawings, and paintings in colour and black-and-white that bring archaeology to life for students.

Gribbin, John & Cherfas, Jeremy

The First Chimpanzee
In the early 1980s, the authors published "The Monkey Puzzle" which argued that humans are 100per cent ape, a sibling species to chimps and gorillas. Dismissed at the time as "armchair theorists", research has vindicated them. This revised edition of the earlier book brings to light subsequent research.

Gribbin, John & Cherfas, Jeremy

The Monkey Puzzle
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Johanson, Donald C. And Edey, Maitland

Lucy, the Beginnings of Humankind
The story of one of the most important fossil finds in man's search for his ancestors - the 60per cent complete female hominid skeleton nicknamed "Lucy". Confirming beyond doubt the early bipedal nature of human ancestors, she was discovered in 1973 in Ethiopia by a team of scientists led by Johanson.

Johanson, Donald C. And Edgar, Blake

From Lucy to Language
From Lucy to Language provides an accessible and up-to-date presentation of the evidence for human evolution: the fossils, artifacts and artwork that paleoanthropologists and archaeologists have discovered and debated during the past century and a half. Produced by a collaboration of scientific, photographic and journalistic talent, this visually stunning and intellectually satisfying volume is valued by professional and armchair anthropologists alike. From Lucy to Language showcases the specimens behind the science of paleoanthropology. The 200 colour illustrations, including many reproduced at actual size, feature the most significant early human skulls and other original fossils and artifacts.

Lambert, David

The Cambridge Guide to Prehistoric Man
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Leakey, Richard

The Origin of Humankind (two copies)
This book provides an account of how the early ape-men of the African Savanna developed into fully human beings. Leakey has always been interested in far more than the mere physical features presented by the fossils, and here he is particularly concerned with non-tangible human attributes. Thus there are chapters on economic co-operation, art, language, and consciousness itself. This is a more technical book than the earlier "Origins" and "Origins Reconsidered", giving the intelligent reader access to the complexities of the subject, but nevertheless very clearly presented.

Leakey, Richard

Making of Mankind
Study of the evolution of mankind over millions of years, by looking at archaeological records. Illustrated with colour photographs.

Leakey, Richard & Lewin, Roger

The Sixth Extinction : Biodiversity and Its Survival
Over the last 530 million years there have been five mass extinctions of species-the last,65 million years ago,when the dinosaurs disappeared.The biodiversity of our planet may now be on the verge,Leakey and Lewin believe,of a sixth extinction,caused this time by the relentless expansion and limitless appetites of human beings. The new science of 'biodiversity',presented clearly and cogently by Leakey and Lewin,combines insights from palaeontology,biology,ecology and even economics.It integrates the role of Darwenian evolution with the increasingly recognised importance of external and unpredictable forces.

Leakey, Richard & Lewin, Roger

Origins Reconsidered : In Search of What Makes Us Human
Richard Leakey questions the widely accepted idea of a 2 million-year-old ancestry of hunters and gatherers - the men hunting, the women raising children - that is the basis of modern man's nuclear family, and asks why the first signs of humanity occurred a mere 15,000 years ago in the cave paintings of Lascaux. What was going on in the minds of men before that first recorded expression of art and humanity occurred? Richard Leakey also wrote "People of the Lake" and "The Making of Mankind". Roger Lewin is also the author of the prize-winning "Bones of Contention".

Lewin, Roger

Human Evolution, an Illustrated Introduction
The brief length and focused coverage of Human Evolution: An Illustrated Introduction have made this best–selling textbook the ideal complement to any biology or anthropology course in which human evolution is taught. The text places human evolution in the context of humans as animals, while also showing the physical context of human evolution, including climate change and the impact of extinctions. Chapter introductions, numerous drawings and photographs, and an essential glossary all add to the accessibility of this text.

Lewin, Roger

Bones of Contention (two copies)
This is a behind-the-scenes look at the search for human origins, analyzing how the biases and preconceptions of paleoanthropologists shape their work. The stories of the Taung Child and Neanderthal Man provide the background to the modern search for an exploration of how and where humans evolved. In this edition, the afterword looks at ways in which paleoanthropology, while becoming more scientific, in many ways remains contentious. It is Lewin's thesis that paleoanthropology is the most subjective of sciences because it engages the emotions of virtually everyone; and since the evidence is scanty, interpretation is all-important.

Lister, Adrian & Bahn, Paul

Mammoths
With stunning color drawings, photographs of artifacts and fossils, and a captivating text, Lister and Bahn introduce some of the least known prehistoric creatures. Often lumped in with dinosaurs, mammoths actually lived 60 million years later, in conjunction with early man. These cousins to the elephant, fascinating in themselves, offer some incredible insights into the evolution of humankind. The authors sort out myths from archaeological findings and share some wonderful news about digs around the world. Appended are a glossary, maps to mammoth sites throughout the world, a guide to sites and museums, and a bibliography.

McCrone, John

The Ape That Spoke : How the Human Mind Evolved
The story of how the human mind evolved from the animal mind of our apeman ancestors to homosapiens. It tells how language evolved, how our memories and imaginations work, what purpose all our mental advances serve and how we learn the facility of self-awareness.

Merriman, Nick

Early People (Eyewitness Guides)
This reference work covers the subject of early people. It is structured so that the individual themes of each spread make up a complete visual story and self-contained module of information.

Moody, Richard

Fossils: The Hamlyn Nature Guide
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Morgan, Elaine

The Scars of Evolution - What Our Bodies Tell Us About Human Origins
An account of what is known as the 'Aquatic Ape' thesis in which Elaine Morgan challenges the traditional theories of evolution.

Morgan, Elaine

The Aquatic Ape Hypothesis
An examination of the evolution of mankind which presents the theory that at some time between 6 and 9 million years ago the ancestors of human beings returned to a marine existence, thus accounting for homo sapiens' major differences from the apes.

Morgan, Elaine

The Descent of the Child : Human Evolution from a New Perspective
This is a new look at human evolution, from the perspective of the child. Children have long been seen, from an evolutionary standpoint, as a developmental stage in the route to adulthood, and their behaviour only as preparation for adult life. The book argues that both the foetus and the young child have their own evolutionary interests, often competing with their parents, and manipulating them for their own interests to great effect. Following the development of a newborn child from zygote to birth and after, the book is a look at how children have evolved from ape to human. It throws new light on our origins and offers a biological critique of urgent contemporary issues, such as family structure, abortion, infertility, over-population and feminism.

Oslon, Steve

Mapping Human History - Discovering the Past Through Our Genes
In this sweeping narrative of the past 150,000 years of human history, Steve Olson draws on new understandings in genetics to reveal how the people of the world came to be. Traveling across four continents, Olson describes the African origins of modern humans and the migration of our ancestors throughout the world. He offers a genealogy of all of humanity, explaining, for instance, why everyone can claim Julius Caesar and Confucius as their forebears and how the history of the Jewish people jibes with, and diverges from, biblical accounts. He shows how groups of people differ and yet are the same, exploding the myth that human races are a biological reality while demonstrating how the accidents of history have resulted in the rich diversity of people today.

Powell, T.G.E.

The Celts (Ancient Peoples and Places)
An account of the language, culture, and traditions of the Celts illuminates ancient life in Europe.

Riley, D.N.

Arial Archaeology in Britain
Aerial surveying is an important technique used in archaeology, providing a new perspective on large sites or features that are hidden at ground level. This book uses fascinating photographs to illustrate the way in which buried sites can be viewed from the air, and detailed diagrams to explain how these artefacts change the appearance of the soil or vegetation, and how they can be mapped and interpreted. An extraordinary number of discoveries have been made and recorded by aerial archaeologists and the author uncovers the most influential and remarkable finds in this comprehensive introduction to a captivating subject.

Roe, Derek

Prehistory
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Scarre, Christopher (Editor)

Past Worlds: "Times" Atlas of Archaeology
An archaeological reconstruction of the human story, using hundreds of maps, illustrations, photographs and reconstructions of ancient sites. As well as examining the well known classical civilisations, it looks at the obscure and mysterious, such as the pyramid temples of the Yucatan.

Sealey, Paul R.

The Boudican Revolt Against Rome
This title tells the story of how the Romans coped with the most serious threat to their hold on Britain and explains the important contribution archaeology has made towards understanding the revolt.

Shreeve, James

Neandertal Enigma: Solving the Mystery of Modern Human Origins
This is a work discussing the controversies of current research into the emergence of modern human beings 30,000 years ago. The book highlights the importance of scientific debates on violence, pair-bonding, family and social structure, sex and language, and the understanding of ourselves.

Simpson, George Gaylord

Life of the Past: Introduction to Palaeontology
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Spindler, Konrad

The Man in the Ice
In 1991 the world was electrified by a chance discovery of a perfectly preserved corpse trapped in an Alpine glacier. Preliminary tests showed that this was the body of a Neolithic hunter who died some 5300 years ago. Now Dr Konrad Spindler, the leader of an international team of scientists examining the body, makes the results of his investigations public for the first time and answers a series of fascinating questions about the Ice Man' and the clues he can give us to the nature of daily life in the late Stone Age. The result is a riveting scientific detective story, giving us the fullest picture yet of Neolithic Man - our ancestor.

Spindler, Konrad

The Man in the Ice
In 1991 the world was electrified by a chance discovery of a perfectly preserved corpse trapped in an Alpine glacier. Preliminary tests showed that this was the body of a Neolithic hunter who died some 5300 years ago. Now Dr Konrad Spindler, the leader of an international team of scientists examining the body, makes the results of his investigations public for the first time and answers a series of fascinating questions about the Ice Man' and the clues he can give us to the nature of daily life in the late Stone Age. The result is a riveting scientific detective story, giving us the fullest picture yet of Neolithic Man - our ancestor.

Stringer, Chris & Gamble, Clive

In Search of the Neanderthals: Solving the Puzzle of Human Origins
Ever since the first discovery of their bones, the Neanderthals have provoked controversy. Who were they? How were they related to modern people? What caused their disappearance 35,000 years ago? The Neanderthals have become the archetype of all that is primitive. But what is their true story? Today Neanderthal specialists are locked in one of the fiercest debates in modern science. One side, the "multiregional" school, argues that the Neanderthals and their contemporaries evolved semi-independently into modern humans. Christopher Stringer leads the "out of Africa" school, which believes that the Neanderthals were replaced by modern people from Africa. Here he sets out his views for the first time, with the archaeologist Clive Gamble. Step by step the authors put forward their case. The Neanderthals had an anatomy crucially different from our own, adapted to Ice Age Europe. Neanderthal behaviour similarly points to fundamental differences. New genetic evidence strongly suggests a single origin for modern humans in Africa. The authors argue that, capable and intelligent as the Neanderthals were, they proved no match for the better-organized, better-equipped newcomers, and died out.

Stringer, Chris & McKie, Robin

African Exodus - The Origins of Modern Humanity
Once in a generation a book such as African Exodus emerges to transform the way we see ourselves. This landmark book, which argues that our genes betray the secret of a single racial stock shared by all of modern humanity, has set off one of the most bitter debates in contemporary science. "We emerged out of Africa," the authors cont, "less than 100,000 years ago and replaced all other human populations." Employing persuasive fossil and genetic evidence (the proof is in the blood, not just the bones) and an exceptionally readable style, Stringer and McKie challenge long-held beliefs that suggest we evolved separately as different races with genetic roots reaching back two million years.

Tattershall, Ian

The Monkey in the Mirror : Essays on the Science of What Makes Us Human
Widely regarded as one of the rare eminent scientists who is also a graceful writer, Ian Tattersall here takes up some of the most controversial questions in evolutionary history in this superb collection of essays. Tattersall stresses that living creatures, including humans, are not finely engineered organisms with every component perfectly adapted to their function. We are - on the contrary - jury-rigged, improvised beings, owing as much to chance as to adaptation. And this is true of all living creatures. Leading the reader around the world and into the far reaches of the past, Tattersall shows us what the science of human evolution is about and what it is up against - from the sparsity of evidence to the pressures of religious fundamentalism. The fundamental questions of our origins - and our evolutionary future - find new life in this extraordinary book, full of delightful stories, scientific wisdom, and fresh insight

Tattershall, Ian

The Monkey in the Mirror : Essays on the Science of What Makes Us Human
Widely regarded as one of the rare eminent scientists who is also a graceful writer, Ian Tattersall here takes up some of the most controversial questions in evolutionary history in this superb collection of essays. Tattersall stresses that living creatures, including humans, are not finely engineered organisms with every component perfectly adapted to their function. We are - on the contrary - jury-rigged, improvised beings, owing as much to chance as to adaptation. And this is true of all living creatures. Leading the reader around the world and into the far reaches of the past, Tattersall shows us what the science of human evolution is about and what it is up against - from the sparsity of evidence to the pressures of religious fundamentalism. The fundamental questions of our origins - and our evolutionary future - find new life in this extraordinary book, full of delightful stories, scientific wisdom, and fresh insight

Taylor, Timothy

The Prehistory of Sex : Four Million Years of Human Sexual Culture
In prehistory, what idea did early humans have of fatherhood? What did they consider to be attractive physical features? Was a distinction made between heterosexuality and homosexuality? What was their idea of propriety - if they had one? These questions are addressed in this book, using new techniques to examine archaeological remains and evolutionary evidence of the prehistoric way of life. The impact of distinctive physical features of the human species is assessed, and sociological developments are also considered. Looking at prehistory in this way raises questions about our own lives in the late 20th century, and the author discusses fiercly-debated modern questions as to whether sexuality is genetically determined, or whether it is nature or nurture which governs our behaviour. He also considers in detail the biological differences between the sexes, in particular reproduction, and the different selection pressures on the sexes. This study is a survey of the sexuality and sexual politics of human existence.

Tudge, Colin

Neanderthals, Bandits & Farmers, How Agriculture Really Began
Tradition has it that agriculture began in the Middle East around 10,000 years ago, that once people realized the advantages of farming, it spread rapidly to the furthest outposts of the world, and that this led to the Neolithic Revolution and the end of the hunting-gathering lifestyle. In this book Colin Tudge argues that agriculture in some form was in the repertoire of our ancestors for thousands of years before the Neolithic farming revolution: people did not suddenly invent agriculture and shout for joy but instead drifted or were forced into it over a long period. What we see in the Neolithic Revolution is not the beginning of agriculture, says Tudge, but the beginning of agriculture on a large scale, in one place, with refined tools. Drawing on a wide range of evidence from fossil records to the Bible, Tudge offers a persuasive hypothesis about a puzzling epoch in our past. In so doing, he provides new insights into the Pleistocene overkill, the demise of the Neanderthals, the location of the biblical Eden, and much more.

Tudge, Colin

The Day Before Yesterday : Five Million Years of Human History
This brilliant and ambitious book is an account of the events that made our world the place it is - geologically, climatically and ecologically - and a call for a new way of thinking about history. 'We learn', Tudge writes, 'to think only in desperately trivial twinklings of time...But this contracted view of time is not merely comic. It is dangerous. ' The proper sense of time, he argues, is one that allows us to appreciate the world and see what we are doing to it. If humankind is to survive, we must 'unlearn' most of what made us good at dominating our environment up to now.

van Oosterzee, Penny

The Story of Peking Man
At the end of the 19th century in China, amateur fossil hunters knew that a ready supply of fossils could be found in backstreet Chinese apothecaries. They were sold as "dragon bones" to be ground down and made into powerful medicines. When the sources of these fossils were tracked down they revealed sites rich with the remains of horses, rhinoceroses, elephants ...and the ancestors of mankind. Set against a background of squabbling Chinese warlords and the Japanese occupation, a team of Chinese and Europeans worked diligently in primitive and often dangerous conditions to uncover the origins of man. What they found was one of the most famous hominid fossils of all time - Peking Man. Penny van Oosterzee presents a historical account of the discovery of Peking Man, from the excavation of one small fossilized molar to the mysterious disappearance of the fossils at the beginning of World War II. The debate about whether modern humans developed in Africa and then spread to the rest of the world or evolved in different parts of the world is an ongoing and passionate one between anthropologists and this book contributes to the debate.

Wells, H.G.

A Short History of the World
Spanning the origins of the Earth to the outcome of the First World War, this is a brilliantly compelling account of the evolution of life and the development of the human race. Along the way, Wells considers such diverse subjects as the Neolithic era, the rise of Judaism, the Golden Age of Athens, the life of Christ, the rise of Islam, the discovery of America and the Industrial Revolution. Breathtaking in its scope and passionate in its intensity, this history remains one of the most readable of its kind.

Wells, Spencer

The Journey of Man : A Genetic Odyssey
Around 60,000 years ago, a man, identical to us in all important respects, walked the soil of Africa. Every man alive today is descended from him. How did he come to be father to all of us - a real-life Adam? And why do we come in such a huge variety of sizes, shapes, types and races if we all share a single prehistoric ancestor? In this fascinating book, Spencer Wells shows how the truth about our ancestors is hidden in our genetic code, and reveals how developments in the cutting-edge science of population genetics have made it possible not just to discover where our ancestors lived (and who they may have fought, loved, learned from and influence) but to create a family tree for the whole of humanity.

Wells, Spencer

The Journey of Man : A Genetic Odyssey
Around 60,000 years ago, a man, identical to us in all important respects, walked the soil of Africa. Every man alive today is descended from him. How did he come to be father to all of us - a real-life Adam? And why do we come in such a huge variety of sizes, shapes, types and races if we all share a single prehistoric ancestor? In this fascinating book, Spencer Wells shows how the truth about our ancestors is hidden in our genetic code, and reveals how developments in the cutting-edge science of population genetics have made it possible not just to discover where our ancestors lived (and who they may have fought, loved, learned from and influence) but to create a family tree for the whole of humanity.

Wendt, Lloyd

Dogs: a Historical Journey
Follows dog and man out of the cave, through ancient Egypt, the Dark Ages, and the Renaissance, and into the present.

Williams, Leonard

Challenge to Survival
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Windle, Bertram C.A.

Remains of the Prehistoric Age in England
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