The Sleeping Beauty And Other Tales: The Science Of Mythology Of Magical Myths

Evening talk

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Chris Knight

The Sleeping Beauty And Other Tales: The Science Of Mythology Of Magical Myths

Tuesday, October 9, 2018 - 18:45

The French anthropologist Claude Levi-Strauss was the first to discover that the world's magical myths and fairy tales all express the same underlying logic. Across all six continents, they are ultimately a single anonymous voice, 'One Myth Only', or so many variations on a theme. Rather as astronomers can still detect an echo of the Big Bang with which the universe began, so by listening to these myths we can detect an echo of the momentous events in which human language and culture were born. When Levi-Strauss' insights are applied to a familiar fairy story from the Brothers Grimm, the picture which emerges is breathtaking.

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Our evening talks include discussion, are free and open to all.

Next evening class

Helena Tuzinska

Doing Things With Questions: Linguistc Anthropology And Refugee Studies
Tuesday, June 2, 2020 - 18:30
Daryll Forde Seminar Room, Anthropology Building, 14 Taviton St, off Gordon Sq., London WC1H 0BW. Tube: Euston Square. map

This is a ZOOM Webinar with Helena Tužinská. You are invited to view her previous RAG Vimeo here
https://vimeo.com/276056479 or read "Doing things with questions"
https://uniba.academia.edu/HelenaTužinská

Please sign up to eventbrite here by June 2, 10 am, to be posted the Zoom link that day
https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/radical-anthropology-tickets-102893170242...

All people are interpreters. None of them can be perceived as a neutral catalyst. Such expectations are incompatible with current understandings of how language works. Listening skills have spatial qualities. Appreciating the whole range of the communicative continuum is „the new normal“ (Lewis). Listening to the lands of interlingual and intra-lingual complexity is just a part of healing justice. Let's unlearn the self-evident. Culturally sensitive interpreting cannot be Slavo-centric, Anglo-centric, Euro-centric or centered on any other language axis. In a multilingual environment it is crucial to form an institutional space for the acknowledgement of diversity of meanings. Interpreting and interpretation is an inseparable part of the process in which people, paraphrasing John L. Austin and John Searle “do things with questions”.